Skip to content
Statistics

Census of population

Bookmark and Share
  • Release date: 25 February 2014
  • Period covered: 2011 (Census)
Every 10 years the nation sets aside one day for the Census - a count of all people and households. The last Census was held on Sunday 27 March 2011.

Characteristics of households in Wales

Release date: 25 February 2014

Key points

  • At 27 March 2011, the average household size in Wales was 2.3 persons with an average number of rooms of 5.7 per household and an average number of bedrooms of 2.9.
  • Around 11 per cent of all households at 27 March 2011 were lone parent families and a third were married or in civil partnerships.
  • There was a much higher percentage of younger Household Reference Persons (HRPs) i.e. those aged under 35, in the private rented sector than across all tenures. Conversely owner–occupier HRPs tended to be concentrated in the older age groups.
  • For over half (59 per cent) of all households the HRP was male. However social housing had a substantially higher percentage of female HRPs than was seen for all households at 54 per compared to 41 per cent across all tenures.
  • In around 3 per cent of all households the HRP was from a Black or Minority Ethnic (BME) background. The highest percentage of households with an HRP from a BME background was in the private rented sector at just under 8 per cent.
  • Christianity continued to the most common religion across all tenures, however less than half of HRPs in the private rented sector reported their religion as Christian.

A statistical bulletin presenting  information about the characteristics of households living in Wales particularly in relation to some of the ‘protected characteristics’ defined under the Equality Act 2010, such as age, gender, ethnic group and religion. The bulletin compares households living in different tenures including social housing, owner-occupied housing and private rented housing.

Analysis of the third release of data for Wales

Release date: 16 May 2013

Key points

  • The age profile of different ethnic groups living in Wales can be very different.
  • For some ethnic groups, Asian/Asian British, Black/Black British and other Whites, the largest groups are between 20 and 39 years old, but in the mixed ethnic group nearly half are under 20 years of age.
  • In 2011, nearly two-thirds (66 per cent, 2.0 million) of the residents of Wales expressed their national identity as Welsh. Of these 218,000 also reported that they considered themselves to be British.
  • In Wales people who describe themselves as belonging to a minority ethnic group are much more likely to say they are British than Welsh (except those from a mixed ethnic group).
  • People living in Wales in the 20 – 39 age group were more likely to record a non-British national identity than those in other age groups.
  • 94 per cent of the 3.06 million people living in Wales were born in the UK, with nearly 6 per cent born outside the UK. Of those from outside the UK the largest number were born in Europe (2.4 per cent) or Asia (1.6 per cent).
  • The age profile of residents of Wales that were born outside differs from the age profile of those that were born in Wales.
  • Very few of the Welsh population aged 80 or over were born outside the UK. Whilst nearly three-quarters of Welsh residents have a UK passport, people living in Wales are more likely (22.4 per cent) to have no passport than people living in England (16.5 per cent) or any of the regions in England.
  • People aged 25 to 34 living in Wales are much more likely than any other age group to have a language other than English or Welsh as their main language (with Polish being the commonest single language after English or Welsh).
  • Fewer that 1 percent of people over the age of 65 living in Wales reported having a main language which was not English or Welsh.
  • The proportion of people saying that they were in bad or very bad health was higher in Wales than in England for males and females and for all age groups.
  • In Wales the health of people providing unpaid care tended to be worse than that of other people. The pattern was the same in England.

Release 2.2 of results for England and Wales

Release date: 30 January 2013

Tables of statistics for output area, ward, parish, and parliamentary constituency geographies (for England and Wales) have been published in this release. This means that data previously published at local authority level (for example, household composition, housing, ethnicity, religion, Welsh language skills, health status, long-term health problems, and employment) are available at a low geographical level.

On 27 March 2011, Wales had 3.1 million usual residents.

Key points

  • 97 per cent of usual residents in Wales aged three years and over reported English or Welsh as their main language in 2011.
  • 3 per cent of the population had a main language other than English or Welsh and three-quarters of that 3 per cent could speak English or Welsh well.
  • 19 per cent of usual residents in Wales aged three and over reported that they could speak Welsh.
  • In 2011, there were fewer electoral divisions with high proportions of people able to speak Welsh than in 2001.
  • After English and Welsh the next most reported main language in Wales was Polish (0.6 per cent, 17,000), followed by Arabic (0.2 per cent, 7,000)/
  • The percentage of usual residents living in a one-family married couple household where at least one household member was aged less than 65 decreased from 50 per cent, (1.4 million) in 2001 to 44 per cent (1.3 million) in 2011.
  • The percentage of usual residents living in a one-family cohabiting couple household where at least one household member was aged less than 65, increased from nine per cent (258,000) in 2001 to 12 per cent (367,000) in 2011.
  • In 2011 67 per cent of the working population travelled to work in a car or van to work in Wales.

Results for ethnicity, national identity and religion for Wales

Release date: 17 December 2012

The following summary is based on the answers to the questions on ethnicity, national identity, and religion for individuals (as distinct from the household questions).

Key points

  • Between 2001 and 2011 the percentage of the population of Wales describing their ethnic group as White British fell from 96.0 per cent to 93.2 per cent.
  • Non-white (including mixed) ethnic groups represented 4.0 per cent of the population in 2011, up from 2.1 per cent in 2001.
  • Those describing their ethnic group as Asian are the second largest ethnic group in Wales. Between 2001 and 2011 the percentage of the population of Wales describing their ethnic group as Asian doubled from 1.1 per cent (32,000) to 2.3 per cent (71,000).
  • Nearly two-thirds (66 per cent, 2.0 million) of the residents of Wales expressed their national identity as Welsh in 2011. Of these 218,000 also reported that they considered themselves to be British.
  • A third of the population of Wales (34.1 per cent) said that they had no Welsh identity.
  • Between 2001 and 2011 the percentage of the population of Wales giving their religion as Christian fell from 71.9 per cent to 57.6 per cent.
  • Between 2001 and 2011 the percentage of the population of Wales saying that they had no religion increased by nearly half a million (from 18.5 per cent to 32.1 per cent).

This Bulletin was not published at 9:30am due to ICT technical issues. As this constitutes a breach of the Code of Practice for Official Statistics, a report was issued to the UK Statistics Authority.

Second release of data for Wales

Release date: 11 December 2012

Key points

  • The usually resident population of Wales was 3.1 million in 2011, a five per cent increase since 2001. Nearly one in five (18 per cent, 563,000) of residents were aged 65 or over.
  • As was the case in 2001, in 2011 Wales had a higher percentage of residents with a long term health problem or disability, just under a quarter (23 per cent, 696,000), higher than any England region.
  • In 2011 nearly two thirds (66 per cent, 2.0 million) of the residents of Wales expressed their national identity as Welsh. Of these 218,000 also reported that they considered themselves to be British.
  • The usually resident population of Wales was 96 per cent (2.9 million) White in 2011, a higher percentage than any of the England regions.
  • Fifty eight per cent (1.8 million) of residents of Wales stated Christian as their religion in 2011, a 14 percentage point drop since 2001, a larger decrease than any of the England regions.  Almost one third (32 per cent, 983,000) of the population in Wales stated they had no religion in 2011, more than any of the England regions.
  • In 2011 five per cent (168,000) of people in Wales were born outside the UK, an increase of two percentage points on 2001 (three per cent, 92,000).
  • The proportion of people able to speak Welsh decreased from 20.8 per cent in 2001 to 19.0 per cent in 2011.
  • In 2011, a higher proportion of households in Wales (67 per cent, 879,000) owned their accommodation than in England (63 per cent, 14.0 million).
    The number of cars and vans available to households in Wales increased from 1.3 to 1.6 million between 2001 and 2011. In 2001 there were on average 11 cars per 10 households whereas in 2011 there were 12 cars per 10 households.
  • Nearly all households in Wales reported that they had central heating in 2011 (98 per cent, 1.3 million). This is an increase of six percentage points on 2001 (92 per cent, 1.1 million).
  • More people (12 per cent, 370,000) in Wales were caregivers than in any England region in 2011. Wales had higher percentages of people providing care for 20 to 49 hours, and 50 or more hours in 2011, than any England region; two per cent (54,000) and three per cent (104,000) respectively.
    One in four of the usually resident population in Wales aged 16 and over (26 per cent, 651,000) reported having no recognised qualifications in 2011. The second largest qualifications category in Wales in 2011 was Level 4 or above eg Bachelor’s degree or above (24 per cent, 614,000).

Second address estimates for local and unitary authorities in England and Wales

Release date: 31 October 012

Questions 5 and 6 of the 2011 Census form asked about second addresses.

Question 5 asked: “Do you stay at another address for more than 30 days a year?”

Question 6 asked: “What is that address?” The possible answers were:

  • armed forces base address
  • another address when working away from home
  • student’s home address
  • student’s term time address
  • another parent or guardian’s address
  • holiday home
  • other.

Most of the questions in the 2011 Census had been asked in earlier censuses but some were new: this is one of the new questions. This second address information was not collected in any previous Census: this is the first time this data is available.

Overall,  1,570,224 usual residents in England and Wales (2.8 per cent) listed themselves as using a second address for more than 30 days a year, and which was located in a local or unitary authority other than the one in which they usually lived. Of these, 12 per cent said that the second address was for work and 11 per cent for holiday purposes; the remaining 77 per cent included students, children of separated parents, and those classed as ‘other’.

In the list of local and unitary authorities with the twenty highest percentages of ‘usual residents elsewhere with a second address in this authority (for all reasons)’ four are in Wales. The city of London has the highest percentage (18.5 per cent) followed by the Isles of Scilly (12.1 per cent). The four in Wales are:

  • Gwynedd (9.9 per cent, 4th in the list)
  • Isle of Anglesey (7.3 per cent, 9th)
  • Pembrokeshire (6.9 per cent, 11th)
  • Ceredigion (6.7 per cent, 15th).

It is important to make the direction of the percentage clear. It means that of the people who do not usually live in Gwynedd,  12,012 people said that they had a second address in Gwynedd (for some reason), which is 9.9 per cent of the 121,874 usual residents of Gwynedd.

Almost half of all second addresses used for holidays (49 per cent) are within 20 local or unitary authorities. The local authorities with the largest number of second addresses used for holidays are Cornwall (10,169) and Gwynedd (7,784). Gwynedd has the highest proportion of second addresses that are used for holidays at 6.4 per cent of the usual resident population.

In the list of local and unitary authorities with the twenty highest percentages of ‘usual residents elsewhere with a holiday second address in this authority’ five are in Wales. The five in Wales are:

  • Gwynedd (6.4 per cent, 1st in the list)
  • Isle of Anglesey (4.1 per cent, 6th)
  • Pembrokeshire (3.5 per cent, 9th)
  • Ceredigion (3.0 per cent, 13th)
  • Conwy (2.8 per cent, 14th).

Again it is important to make the direction of the percentage clear. It means that of the people who do not usually live in Gwynedd,  7,784 people said that they had a holiday second address in Gwynedd, which is 6.4 per cent of the 121,874 usual residents of Gwynedd.

First results for Wales

Release date: 16 July 2012

Key points

  • On census night the population in Wales was 3.06 million. This was the largest the population had ever been.
  • The population grew by 153,000 in the 10 years since the last census, rising from 2.9 million in 2001, an increase of 5.3 per cent. This was the largest growth in the population since 1921.
  • While the difference between births and deaths led to a small increase in the population, migration accounted for over 90 per cent of the population increase between 2001 and 2011. This includes both international migration and migration from elsewhere within the UK.
  • The percentage of the population in Wales aged 65 and over was the highest seen in any census at over 18 per cent, a total of 563,000 people. This was an increase of 57,000 people in this age category since 2001, and an increase of 450,000 since 1911 when there were 113,000 people aged 65 and over.
  • There were 25,000 residents in Wales aged 90 and over in 2011, compared with 19,000 in 2001 and 700 in 1911.
  • In 2011, there were 178,000 children under five in Wales, 11,000 more than in 2001.
  • There were 1.3 million households in Wales on census night. The average household size was 2.3 residents per household, in 2011, the same as in England and unchanged from 2001. In 1911, households in England and Wales had an average of 4.3 residents, almost double the current total.
  • All areas of Wales saw population growth between 2001 and 2011 except Blaenau Gwent, which saw a small decline.
  • The unitary authorities with the largest percentage growth in population were Cardiff (12 per cent), Pembrokeshire (8 per cent), and Bridgend (8 per cent).

Contact

Tel: 029 2082 3220
Email: stats.popcensus@wales.gsi.gov.uk

Keep up to date @StatisticsWales@StatisticsWales